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View Full Version : A guide to Logic Signals, Wireless Logic, and a special method of Demitting



robbit10
08-29-2010, 01:42 PM
Note: You must have a fair understanding of logic to understand the jargon used in this tutorial.
Excuse the [picture]'s in this tutorial. I have yet to take those screenshots.

Logic Signals
This is, for most people, a new type of logic. Some of the best creators are already using it, but still, it seemed useful to explain this to most of the LBP creators, since this is a very valuable tool to have in your arsenal.

See, magnetic key switches activate when a magnetic key is near them.. But have you ever thought about emitting that magnetic key, on an invisible piece of dark matter, to send a signal from somewhere far away? This, is what I call a Logic Signal.

A logic signal is, quite simply, just an emitted magnetic key. It activates whatever magnetic key switch picks up the magnetic key, or in other words, picks up the "signal". In combination with a button, or something else that sends a one-shot signal to the emitter, you can make something "send" a signal of a particular color (emit a magnetic key of a particular color), which then activates the magnetic key switches that are set to that color.

To begin with Logic Signals, first you need the core part of the whole thing: The signal that you send.

First, turn on the Small Grid, then stamp a 2x2 block of dark matter into the world, and put a red magnetic key on it. Set the magnetic key to not visible.
[picture]

Then, turn off the Small Grid, and resize the dark matter until it is so tiny that it is invisible. Capture it, and call it "Invisible Red Magnetic Key".
[Picture]

Now you have the core component that you need for sending logic signals!

Demitters
Say you have an object you emit. You want it to dissolve when someone presses a button. You can use several ways for this. There's the dissolve material trick, the de/re-mitter trick, but also... You can use a Logic Signal. Here's a tutorial on how to create a very simple demitter that works on any object. The only drawback is that it uses a creature brain which means that it'll give the player 50 points when the object is demitted.

Create a block of wood. Then, put a red magnetic key switch on it, and tweak the radius to the maximum. Set the magnetic key switch's output to 1-shot, and set it to not visible.
[Picture]

Then, put a creature brain onto the block of wood, and connect the magnetic key switch to the brain.
[Picture]

Capture the block of wood you just made, and create a new 2x2 block of dark matter. Put an emitter on it, and set it like so:


Duration: 9.0s
Lifetime: Infinite
Max emitted at once: 1

[picture]

Then, tweak the emitter and make it emit the block of wood you made just then.
[Picture]

Next, create yet another 2x2 block of dark matter, and make it emit the "Invisible Red Magnetic Key" you made a while back. Stamp a button into the world, set it to one-shot, connect it to the emitter, and you're done!
[Picture]

Now, unpause, and try pressing the button. If you did it correctly, you'll see that the block of wood disappears, and comes back a short while after. This is because when you press the button, the emitter emits the invisible red magnetic key, which is detected by the magnetic key switch on the emitted block of wood, which activates the creature brain. Basically, you sent a "signal" to the emitted object! And that, is a Logic Signal.

Wireless Logic
Imagine, you want some things to activate when you press a certain button. But you want to easily be able to add in more of the objects that get activated with the button, without wiring them up! What you would do, is use a Logic Signal to activate all these objects. Then you can place as many of the objects as you want, and they'll all catch the signal (when it is in range of the magnetic key, that is. There is an (advanced) solution to the range problem, which will be explained in the next paragraph.)

As an example, grab a LED light from your Goodies Bag. Put a purple magnetic key switch on it, increase the range to the max. Wire the purple magnetic key switch to the light which it is placed on.
[Picture]
When a "signal is sent" (or, in other words, an emitter in the range of the magnetic key switches emits the magnetic key of the colour (in this case purple) which would activate the magnetic switches), the magnetic key switches will activate and the lights will turn on.

To test this, create a 2x2 block of dark matter and put an emitter on it. Then grab your invisible red magnetic key, and adjust the magnetic key so that it turns purple. Then capture that, and name it whatever you want. Next, make the emitter emit that magnetic key. Set the emitter to these settings:


Duration: 0.1s
Lifetime: 0.2s
Max emitted at once: 1

[picture]

Then plop a button into the world, and connect it to the emitter. Set it to one-shot.
[Picture]
Now, when you press the button, all the lights which are close enough to the emitter will flash briefly. And you didn't even connect the button to the lights!

Expanding the Signal Range
You might've seen that there's a slight problem with this: Magnetic key switches don't have a max range that spans the entire level. There are two solutions for this. The first is the method I discovered, which is glitch-free but introduces some very minor latency. The second method is a glitched method, which has no latency at all. It was discovered by a guy named "bob is named bob". Choose whichever you want.

With the help of a little device I like to call a Range Extender, your signal can be sent to anywhere in the level! See, the way these Range Extenders work, is they catch the signal that is sent to them... and then "send" (emit) another signal of the same color. They extend the signal's range.

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/7081/wirelesslogicsenderrece.jpg
This is a range extender.

As an example, create a 2x4 block of dark matter. Put a red magnetic key switch on the top part of it. Set it's range to maximum and it's output to 1-shot. Next, grab an emitter and plop it onto the bottom part of the block of dark matter. Make it emit an invisible red magnetic key. Then, connect the top magnetic key switch to the emitter on the bottom. You've just made a Range Extender! Capture this object, because this will be very handy indeed.

Now, place a Range Extender into the level, and then put another one next to it, a bit far from it but not too much out of range of the magnetic key that is on it. Place another one next to it, not too close and not too far.
Next, create a 2x2 block of dark matter with an emitter on it that emits an invisible red magnetic key, and connect a 1-shot button to it. From now on, we'll call this device a "Start Signal Sender". When you press the button, and you've done it correctly, you'll see that all three of the Range Extenders get activated and send out their signal, even though you only connected the button to the Start Signal Sender. Since a Range Expander emits a signal where it's placed, your objects just have to be close to the Range Expander, not the start emitter, to activate when the signal gets sent. If you place Range Expanders throughout the entire level, the signal will travel through the entire level. And all this happens in a few milliseconds.


In my examples level, i have a demo of this that is a bit more complicated than what i've explained here. It is a global weather system, that causes lightning and makes the sound hearable anywhere in the level (using Range Expanders with sound objects on them).

This is the base logic piece.
http://img844.imageshack.us/img844/9316/aphoto37.jpg
It sends out the signal every time the pulse switch (the circle with the arrow on it) pulses (it causes the Switcher to switch to it's right position, where the magnetic key switch is set to one-shot and activates the emitter that sends out the signal. This is done so because it had to cause a flash in the level. It also causes a flash by changing the global lighting to a very bright hue and back.

And here is a Range Expander, customized for the Global Weather System.:
http://img696.imageshack.us/img696/4811/aphoto38.jpg
Note that a wireless sender/receiver doesn't have to be this full of sound objects, which are only for the purpose of the weather sounds. A wireless sender/receiver only has to have one emitter and a magnetic key switch on it.

The system works like this: You place the base component, and then you place these wireless receivers/senders, throughout the entire level. You don't need to connect them up, since it's wireless. Then, when the wireless receiver/sender receives the signal, it sends out the signal (emits a red magnetic key on a block of dark matter) which is then picked up by the Range Expander next to it, which also sends out the signal, which is then picked up by the Range Expander next to it, and it causes a very fast, almost instantaneous chain reaction by which the signal is sent to all the Range Expanders in the entire level.



From this thread (http://www.lbpcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?33550-How-to-make-a-mag-key-switch-trigger-radius-go-across-the-entire-map):


Did you ever need to have a sensor switch detect something across the entire map? Like a player tracker or something or maybe a HUD?
Heres how.

1. get a small piece of dark matter.
2. attach proximity sensor or mag key switch on
3. tweak radius to as far as possible ( it wont be across the map yet)
4. make the dark matter HUGE
5. detach your proximity sensor or mag key and attach it again
6. cut around your prox or mag switch
7. repeat steps 4-6 three times

Yes it is very similar to making mirror material

So far ive been able to make a tracking missile that will track you from across the entire map and a few other things.

EDIT: It seems you only need to repeat it 1-2 times as aya042 has said. Thanks aya!
Also, You can do the same for

* Sticker Switch
* Camera Zone
* Photo Booth


Nice.

I knew that resizing a mag switch or sensor switch also scaled the radius proportionally, but I didn't know that detaching and reattaching kept the new radius intact.

Since cutting into a material which has been oversized can sometimes crash the PS3, I'd suggest changing the method to attach it to a new piece of DM each time, rather than continuously cutting/rescaling the same piece.

Having said that, however, when I tested this, it seems that repeating the process is unnecessary, and that you need only rescale the switch by a factor of around 20 to encompass the entire level. So the process can be shortened to...

Create a 2x2 block of DM and attach a mag switch.
Make the radius as large as possible.
Resize the block of DM so it's at least 40x40.
Detach the switch, and put it wherever you want it.


Note the same process works for these things...

Magnetic Switch
Sensor Switch
Sticker Switch
Camera Zone
Photo Booth

...but not these...

Magic Mouth
Creature Brain
Global Lighting Object
Global Water Object
MGS Searchlight
Music Box

...although in some instances you can make the sensor radius larger as long as you don't detach/shrink it afterwards.


For a demonstration of most of the things explained in this tutorial, go to my levels and find my "Examples for my Logic Signals tutorial" level.

Comments, ideas, suggestions, ratings, and more of that sort are appreciated, as long as it is constructive. :)

Vanemiera
08-29-2010, 02:03 PM
Nice tutorial. The technique is nothing new though. Already used by many people. oP

robbit10
08-29-2010, 04:01 PM
Nice tutorial. The technique is nothing new though. Already used by many people. oP
Aw, I thought I was one of the first.

Blackfalcon
08-29-2010, 05:33 PM
Expanding the Signal Range looks thermo heavy to be honest. Anyway in LBP2 we'll be able to tweak sounds so that they can be heard everywhere in the level.

http://i.neoseeker.com/mgv/272671-Blackfalcon/671/5/animal0064hb2_display.gif

robbit10
08-29-2010, 07:59 PM
Expanding the Signal Range looks thermo heavy to be honest. Anyway in LBP2 we'll be able to tweak sounds so that they can be heard everywhere in the level.
On the contrary, it is very light on the thermometer.

Blackfalcon
08-29-2010, 08:02 PM
Oh, fair enough. xD I suppose it saves the screen from being cluttered with wires.

http://i.neoseeker.com/mgv/272671-Blackfalcon/671/5/animal0064hb2_display.gif

robbit10
08-30-2010, 05:40 AM
Oh, fair enough. xD I suppose it saves the screen from being cluttered with wires.
I mostly put that in the weather machine so I and others didn't have to connect up the sound boxes once you placed them. It saves a lot of time. And it's a good demonstration of sending a signal through the entire level to make something happen globally.
But as I said in the tutorial, I'm going to put a few screenshot tutorials in there and adjust the explanation to make it easier to understand for all of you.

@Vanemiera: I did notice other people using it, but I thought that not many people knew how to do this. So I posted a tutorial on it here.

robbit10
09-01-2010, 02:29 PM
I've done a major update of the tutorial. Hopefully, it'll be much easier to understand now for everyone who reads it.

Sehven
09-01-2010, 07:01 PM
Very nice tut. There's an easier way to extend signal range, though, and it'll eliminate the lag that your system introduces.
From this thread (http://www.lbpcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?33550-How-to-make-a-mag-key-switch-trigger-radius-go-across-the-entire-map):

Did you ever need to have a sensor switch detect something across the entire map? Like a player tracker or something or maybe a HUD?
Heres how.

1. get a small piece of dark matter.
2. attach proximity sensor or mag key switch on
3. tweak radius to as far as possible ( it wont be across the map yet)
4. make the dark matter HUGE
5. detach your proximity sensor or mag key and attach it again
6. cut around your prox or mag switch
7. repeat steps 4-6 three times

Yes it is very similar to making mirror material

So far ive been able to make a tracking missile that will track you from across the entire map and a few other things.

EDIT: It seems you only need to repeat it 1-2 times as aya042 has said. Thanks aya!
Also, You can do the same for

* Sticker Switch
* Camera Zone
* Photo Booth

piggabling
09-01-2010, 07:08 PM
Interesting... I've never seen it before so you've helped me!

Thanks to you to Sehven. I hadn't known that either... I'm out of the loop... :blush:

robbit10
09-01-2010, 08:40 PM
@Sehven: Oh.. That seems like a much better way to extend the signal range. Thanks for telling me! I'll incorporate that into the next edit of the tutorial.
@piggabling: Glad it was of use to you.

Sehven
09-03-2010, 09:52 AM
I'll incorporate that into the next edit of the tutorial.

Might wanna' talk to bob is named bob about that. He posted that as a tut, so it'd probably be best to talk it over with him before adding it to your tut to avoid stepping on any toes. Either that, or just link to his thread in your post. I'm not sure if there are any rules about that, and I'm not a big proponent of the "ownership of ideas," but I think it'd be the polite thing to do since he just posted that tut like two weeks ago.

robbit10
09-03-2010, 06:13 PM
Might wanna' talk to bob is named bob about that. He posted that as a tut, so it'd probably be best to talk it over with him before adding it to your tut to avoid stepping on any toes. Either that, or just link to his thread in your post. I'm not sure if there are any rules about that, and I'm not a big proponent of the "ownership of ideas," but I think it'd be the polite thing to do since he just posted that tut like two weeks ago.
I'll just edit my tutorial to include his info, give him credit, and link to his thread.

I've asked him too, via a PM.

EDIT: I've put all the information inside spoiler tags so you can read what you want and collapse what you don't.