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View Full Version : [PRIVACY ISSUE] LBPC Ads are trying to violate my privacy (without permission)



fatman689
01-28-2011, 01:13 AM
So, could someone come here and explain me this?!?:

http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/8589/lbp2privacyissue.jpg

In other words,

ERROR: Permission denied for to call method Location.toString on .This is basically an error caused by http://ads.lfstmedia.com on the page http://www.lbpcentral.com - what happens here is a line of code (method), Location.toString, which gets your location (Location) as coordinates and then turns it into a line of text (string), but my loveable Mozilla Firefox protected me from it. I love ya' :D

These scripts could do anything with your location, and you don't want it to be spilled out.
Usually, in early times, these types of scripts would successfully get your personal information without even having you noticing it. But since the technology constanly advances, you are invulnerable to them if you are using updated software.

However, people with outdated software could easily be infiltrated in a matter of time without noticing it. Also, hackers are also trying to beat that silly technology by using the Backdoor, but well, that's another topic. :)

Shouldn't be this site full of truthworthiness?
Shouldn't it be free of bad scripts caused by ads trying to copy your location to teh intertubes without permission?

I think this 'Ad' thingy has gone a little bit too far.
Please be more careful when deciding what ads to publish to your page, since there's bad people trying to do bad stuff to very innocent people on teh internets, and I hate that.

Keep that in mind and thanks for reading.

Enlong3
01-28-2011, 02:34 AM
I'm pretty sure they pull up your location just to show relevant ads to you. For example, I usually see ads for attractions near where I live. I think they most they get is just your general IP location which is not very accurate anyway. It is very common for advertising companies to use location targeted marketing. I don't think it is a really big concern IMO.

Testudini
01-28-2011, 02:48 AM
Back before I had AdBlock, bout once a week Google Chrome went crazy talking about some ad giving a virus. Strangely that isn't what caused me to get AdBlock, but all the YouTube advertisements... :p

rtm223
01-28-2011, 08:38 AM
The javascript Location property relates to the URL of the web page. It has nothing to do with the geographical location of the user. WRT the specific security issue involved, this (http://bugs.adobe.com/jira/browse/FP-561) could be of use. Which all makes the "For the people who don't know about that kind of stuff" note kinda ironic.


Move along now, nothing to see here ;)

ConfusedCartman
01-28-2011, 08:34 PM
Just a quick note:

Although this specific issue isn't really an issue at all (thanks again rtm223 :)), I just want to address ad behavior on the site. To an extent, certain ads and ad networks will gather some some contextual data. Info about the current page, your IP's geographic location, etc. This data is used to identify you as a web user, and deliver more ads. It is a tactic used to improve ad click numbers - because, if ads are relevant to you, then it's safe to assume you'll click more often.

This is not new behavior. Ads have done this for a number of years. You'll enounter it on any site that displays ads. If this concerns you, there are a number of robust (and free) tools out there to block the display of ads and ensure you're not being "catered to" by ad networks. A simple Google search will return at least 3 or 4 options for you to pick from. We don't advertise those tools here because we'd lose money if we did. If you enjoy what LBPC has to offer, then do us a favor and leave the ads where they are (or donate (http://www.lbpcentral.com/forums/donate.php?do=paypal) - that removes ads too). We're driven by our community, and we need those ad dollars to remain open - so our success really is in your hands.

Gawdl3y
01-29-2011, 01:51 AM
It's nothing you should worry about. Anything can get your location, via your IP Address. It isn't specific though (it usually only goes down to the city-level), and it isn't very accurate.