PDA

View Full Version : Something you may not have known about the music sequencer...



Fang
02-19-2011, 03:50 AM
Okay so you know those sample sounds that come on when your cursor is on an instruments, it makes a simple tune, yet when you use the instrument it doesn't sound like it (specifically synth strings)?

I discovered a useful trick that you probably (at least I) didn't know about.

If you select a note and tilt left or right on the right stick, it will change certain properties of the sound. For example, synth strings will sound more like strings, concertia will have a distict eastern feel to it, triangle wave will have more "pan flute" like sounds, etc.

You can see if it works if the notes turn orange or some other color.

Hope this gives your sound variety a lil more OMPH! :D


(P.S. sorry there's no images, I wanted to share this fast.)

QuAcKeRz12
02-19-2011, 04:11 AM
Yeah this is an awesome tip for the music people. Thanks!

kodymcq
02-19-2011, 04:16 AM
Now all we need is to figure out how MM made multiple tracks switch on and off D:

Beedy10
02-19-2011, 04:04 PM
They add as many channels as there are instruments (makes like 'Interactive' music), then put multiple sequencers in the level, with different volumes on the channels. This way, different instruments start/end at different points. Hope this helps.

pivottt
02-19-2011, 07:12 PM
Oh. My. God.
Thank you so much!
I made 4 songs and guitar never sounded great, I'll see if it works !
Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

rialrees
02-20-2011, 11:22 AM
I've only just started playing around with the sequencer, so this will really help a lot - many thanks!

>er.
02-20-2011, 11:45 AM
ya know, this is in the tutorials, if you don't wanna try to figure out every function by yourself i prefer you to really watch them :p

Mr_T-Shirt
02-20-2011, 12:32 PM
I think a lesser known fact about the music sequencer is that you can change an instrument without losing any of the notes by simple placing a new instrument over the old one.

Madafaku
02-21-2011, 06:01 AM
I think a lesser known fact about the music sequencer is that you can change an instrument without losing any of the notes by simple placing a new instrument over the old one.

Would of saved me a headache to have known this earlier... thanks!

AeroForce22
02-21-2011, 06:20 AM
.......

@_@ Really? Wow. I was in the beta too and all I ever did was music, and if I had known this sooner...@_@ GAH

Thanks. xD I can't believe I never experimented with that.

Bloo_boy
02-21-2011, 06:24 AM
You mean making the notes bigger and smaller? yeah it changes i noticed that ^___^ ive been experimenting with it XD im music studying lol, im not there yet...but Im practicing >_<.

PloXyZeRO
02-21-2011, 08:00 PM
I think a lesser known fact about the music sequencer is that you can change an instrument without losing any of the notes by simple placing a new instrument over the old one.

You just brought a tear to my eye.. :'D

I think I'm in love with you.

Fang
02-22-2011, 07:10 PM
I think a lesser known fact about the music sequencer is that you can change an instrument without losing any of the notes by simple placing a new instrument over the old one.

Funny thing is that I discovered that waaay before this trick lol

Tygers
02-22-2011, 07:51 PM
Another thing you can do with music sequencers is treat them like regular sequencers. Say you have a song that you want to change something about in the middle (For example, switch to a swing beat). Just put a battery after the last track and connect it to the input of the next music sequencer in the set.

Boscoe
02-24-2011, 10:38 PM
I think a lesser known fact about the music sequencer is that you can change an instrument without losing any of the notes by simple placing a new instrument over the old one.

Actually, this works with other items as well. I discovered this feature to my horror when I attempted to place a follower too close to a gravity tweaker and instead of pasting the follower, it converted the tweaker into a follower instead!

Tygers
02-24-2011, 11:10 PM
Actually, this works with other items as well. I discovered this feature to my horror when I attempted to place a follower too close to a gravity tweaker and instead of pasting the follower, it converted the tweaker into a follower instead!

I've used this technique to wire up grids of chips in a predictable pattern. I just laid out a 2x2 mini grid, then pasted it over itself overlapping by 1. This actually does paste a chip over the other, so then I picked up the overlapping chips and dropped them, and it replaced it. The great thing is it merges the wiring, so the chips get wired up automatically with just a quick grab and drop.

Wayward
02-24-2011, 11:14 PM
I think a lesser known fact about the music sequencer is that you can change an instrument without losing any of the notes by simple placing a new instrument over the old one.

:o Lesser known fact indeed. I had no idea. Very helpful.

iBubek
03-07-2011, 03:37 AM
Up down modifies the volume. Left right modifies the timbre. Read the little notices, or watch the tutorials, it's all right there. Well, nothing new learned here. -_-

MR_MASSIMO
03-10-2011, 10:27 PM
Tutorial only said volume and swing & whatnot, I'll try out timbre

pivottt
05-02-2011, 01:32 AM
What ? Dam... dum dim doo bi doo ^^
It means I wasted 10 hours of my life. Most of my songs include parts in piano and parts in techno soundwaves, but the same notes.
God ! Knowing this, I guess pasting a sound FX over the other one keeps the same settings ! I wonder if it keeps the actual "sound" setting... if not, that means you could change a whole set of high piano sounds for low piano sounds. But I'll see later. What drives me nuts is the fact that I got a 50$ PSN card I can't use, so I'm too frustrated to go on the PS3.

xero
05-08-2011, 08:29 AM
You mean making the notes bigger and smaller? yeah it changes i noticed that ^___^ ive been experimenting with it XD im music studying lol, im not there yet...but Im practicing >_<.

Nay, notes growing and shrinking is a result of changing the individual note's volume, which will let you create such effects as fading notes out, etc. What the OP is referring to is in fact modifying a note's Timbre, which is mentioned in the tutorials section by your friend and mine Stephen Fry.